Diabetes is a chronic disease with serious complications, currently affecting an estimated 1.7 million Australians. About 280 adults develop diabetes every day, yet research shows that most Australians think diabetes is not a serious illness and believe they have a lower risk of developing it than they actually do.

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Type 1

Type 1 diabetes occurs when the pancreas is unable to make the hormone insulin. Insulin acts like a key to open cells and let glucose enter from the blood.

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Type 2

Type 2 diabetes is a condition where the beta cells in the pancreas still make insulin, but it may not make enough, or the insulin that is being made does not do its job properly.

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Nearly one in four adults over the age of 25 years has either diabetes or a condition known as ‘pre-diabetes’.  This is when blood glucose levels are higher than normal but not high enough to be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. There are two conditions that fit into this category;

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Women with diabetes (both type 1 and type 2) can have a healthy baby. It is recommended you plan your pregnancy. This means making sure your diabetes is well managed and your general health is good. 

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