People with diabetes can enjoy the same healthy meals as the whole family.  Read our healthy cooking fact sheet for ideas on how to make small changes to your favourite recipes.
 
Some great ways to make recipes healthier are to:
  • add extra fibre
  • add extra fruit & vegetables
  • reduce the amount of sugar, salt, or saturated fat

Our recipe of the month is recommended by our dietitians using Diabetes Australia’s own recipe guidelines.

Diabetes Victoria members have access to a large range of recipes and meal plans that meet our nutrition guidelines. Find out more about membership.
 

Tuna and couscous salad 

Live Lighter Victoria

Preparation time: 10 minutes 
Serves: 6

Type of recipe: light meals and lunches

Ingredients

  • 1 cup couscous

  • 1 cup boiling water

  • 420g can tuna in springwater, drained and flaked

  • 420g can no-added-salt corn kernels, drained 

  • 2 cups frozen peas

  • 4 spring onions (including green tops), finely sliced

  • 1 cup finely chopped coriander

  • 2 tablespoons sweet chilli sauce

  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice

  • 2 teaspoons curry powder, optional 


Method

  1. Place couscous in a small heatproof bowl, pour over boiling water; cover and set aside for 3 minutes.  

  2. Into a large bowl combine tuna, corn, peas, spring onions and coriander.  

  3. Fluff couscous with a fork to separate grains and stir through sweet chilli sauce, lemon juice and curry powder.  

  4. Add couscous to salad ingredients, mix well and serve.


Variation

  • Replace couscous with 2 cups cooked quinoa or brown rice.

  • Add a drained 420g can of no-added-salt 4-bean mix, chickpeas or cannellini beans.

  • Add a diced avocado just before serving.


Nutrition information

Per serve (6)
Energy    958 kJ
Protein    18.7 g
Total fat    2.3 g
Saturated fat    0.5 g
Carbohydrate    29.4 g
Sodium    249.1 mg
Fibre    7.2 g

ACKNOWLEGEMENT:
This recipe has been reproduced with permission from LiveLighter. LiveLighter is a public health campaign which aims to educate adults about the risks associated with being overweight or obese and help them make simple, lasting changes to their lifestyles. For more information, visit livelighter.com.au